Boy Scout Advancement & Recognition

 

Advancement, one of the eight methods of Boy Scouting, has four steps through each award level.

First, the Scout learns. Much of his learning comes from other boys in his Patrol or Troop and by active participation in Troop program.

Second, the Scout is tested. The specific requirements determine the kind of testing, either verbally or by demonstration.

Third, the Scout is reviewed. The purpose of the review is to ensure that all requirements for advancement have been met, including positive attitude and living by the ideals of Scouting.

Fourth, the Scout is recognized. The final step in advancement involves presentation of the badge, usually at a ceremony before the entire Troop.

 

Learn More about early rank requirements with an interactive guide.  click here

Scout. The Scout rank is the first rank of Boy Scouts.  To complete the rank, a new Scout must complete a Boy Scout application and join a Troop.  He must also be able to repeat the Pledge of Allegiance, demonstrate the Scout sign, salute and handshake, tie a square knot, and describe the Scout badge.  Finally, he must understand and agree to live by the Scout Oath, Law, Motto, Slogan, and the Outdoor Code.

 

 

Tenderfoot. Tenderfoot is the second rank of Boy Scouts.  A Scout can complete requirements for any other rank in virtually any order, but the ranks must be earned in sequence (Scout, Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life, and Eagle).  To earn the Tenderfoot rank, a Scout must complete requirements dealing with camping, hiking, the American Flag, the Scout Oath, Law, Motto, and Slogan, the patrol method, the buddy system, physical fitness, plants, and first aid.

 

 

 

Second Class. Second Class is the third rank of Boy Scouts.  A Scout can complete requirements for any other rank in virtually any order, but the ranks must be earned in sequence (Scout, Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life, and Eagle).  To earn the Second Class rank, a Scout must complete requirements dealing with orienteering, camping, wood tools, cooking, a flag ceremony, a service project, wildlife, first aid, swimming, drug and alcohol prevention, and personal safety.

 

 

 

First Class. First Class is the fourth rank of Boy Scouts.  A Scout can complete requirements for any other rank in virtually any order, but the ranks must be earned in sequence (Scout, Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life, and Eagle).  To earn the First Class rank, a Scout must complete requirements dealing with orienteering, camping, cooking, constitutional rights, plants, knots, lashings, swimming, recruitment, and the internet.

 

 

 

Star. Star is the fifth rank of Boy Scouts.  A Scout can complete requirements for any other rank in virtually any order, but the ranks must be earned in sequence (Scout, Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life, and Eagle).  The requirements for the Star rank are much different than the previous ranks.  To earn the Star rank, a Scout must be active in their Troop and Patrol for at least 4 months after earning First Class, earn 6 merit badges, including 4 from those required for Eagle, complete service projects totaling at least 6 hours of work, and serve in a leadership position in the Troop for at least 4 months.

 

 

 

Life. Life is the sixth rank of Boy Scouts.  A Scout can complete requirements for any other rank in virtually any order, but the ranks must be earned in sequence (Scout, Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life, and Eagle).  The requirements for the Life rank are similar to those of the Star rank.  To earn the Life rank, a Scout must be active in their Troop and Patrol for at least 6 months after earning Star, earn 5 additional merit badges beyond those earned for Star (total of 11), including 3 more from those required for Eagle, complete service projects totaling at least 6 hours of work, and serve in a leadership position in the Troop for at least 6 months.

 

 

 

Eagle. Eagle is the seventh and highest rank of Boy Scouts.  A Scout can complete requirements for any other rank in virtually any order, but the ranks must be earned in sequence (Scout, Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life, and Eagle).  To earn the Eagle rank, a Scout must be active in their Troop and Patrol for at least 6 months after earning Life, earn a total of 21 merit badges, including 12 required merit badges (First Aid, Citizenship in the Community, Citizenship in the Nation, Citizenship in the World, Communications, Personal Fitness, Emergency Preparedness OR Lifesaving, Environmental Science, Personal Management, Swimming OR Hiking OR Cycling, Camping, and Family Life), serve in a leadership position in the Troop for at least 6 months, and complete an Eagle Scout service project which is helpful to any religious institution, school, or community.

For more information, please see our Eagle Scout section of this site.

 

 

 

Eagle Palms. Eagle Palms are earned after a Scout has earned the Eagle Scout award.  To earn Palms, an Eagle Scout must be active in their Troop and Patrol for at least 3 months after becoming an Eagle Scout or after earning the last Palm, demonstrate Scout Spirit and leadership ability, and earn 5 additional merit badges beyond those required for Eagle or the last palm.  Merit badges earned at any time can be used towards the required 5 for each Palm.  The Bronze Palm represents 5 merit badges, the Gold 10, and the Silver 15.  The Palms must be earned in order and only the appropriate combination of Palms should be worn to signify the total number of merit badges earned beyond those required for Eagle.

 

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